The Data Game

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Team member checking a camera-trap

 

So we all know there are millions of images on snapshot Serengeti and that it is us citizen scientists who do all the work classifying them. The scientists can then get on with the task of figuring out what’s going on out there in the animal kingdom, hopefully in time to save some of it from our own destructive nature.

But… have you spared much thought as to how the images go from over 200 individual camera-traps dotted around the Serengeti to the Zooniverse portal  in a state for us to start our work.

Firstly the SD cards have to be collected from the cameras and as this is an ongoing study replaced with fresh SD cards. This is done about every 6 to 8 weeks. A camera traps batteries can actually go on performing far longer than this but as the field conditions can be tough you never know when a camera may malfunction. This time frame is a good balance between not ending up with months worth of gaps in the data and not spending every minute in the field changing cards.

The team are able to check about 6 to 10 sites a day so with 225 cameras in play it takes around a month just to get to each site. Mostly the cameras are snapping away happily but there are always some that have had encounters with elephants or hyena but actually some of the most destructive critters can be bugs, they like to make nests of the camera boxes. As well as checking the cameras themselves the sites need to be cleared of any interfering foliage, we all know how frustrating a stray grass blade can be.

 

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Snake camping out inside the camera-trap

 

So with a hard drive full of all the data it then has to wait for a visiting field researcher to hand carry it back to the University of Minnesota, USA. It means the data is only received every 6 months or so but it is far safer than trusting the post. Once safely received it is up to Meredith to start the painstaking work of extracting the date time stamps. As sometimes happens there are glitches and she has to fix this by figuring out when the camera went off line or when capture events got stuck together. She says it is much like detective work. The images are then assigned codes and stored on the Minnesota Supercomputer Institute (MSI) servers.

Once it is all cleaned up and backed up it is sent to the Zooniverse team who then format it for their system giving new identifiers to each image. Finally it is ready for release to all the thousands of classifiers out there to get to work on.

So as you can see it really is a team effort and a massive under taking. It is no good collecting tonnes of data if there is no one with the time to do anything with it. I will take this opportunity again to thank you for all your help with the project. Keep up the good work.

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About lucy Hughes

I am a moderator on Snapshot Serengeti, you will see me post as lucycawte. In my spare time I am studying an MSc in Wildlife biology and conservation. After living on a nature reserve in Southern Africa for several years my passion for all things wild is well and truly fired!

4 responses to “The Data Game”

  1. Roy John says :

    I have not participated for a couple of years (my name is in the thank you to volunteers list). I have tried to login and failed, so I tried to sign up again. Your system keeps rejecting my name and my 9 digit password. I have changed my e mail address. Please advise.

    • lucy Hughes says :

      Hi Roy,
      I am sorry to here you are having trouble. I think the best solution is to go onto the zooniverse site (you can do this without logging on) and talk with the tech guys there. They should be able to help you.

  2. Diedelinde Maene says :

    Hello Lucy, thank you for sharing the photo of the camera trap with the snake. I always wondered what these camera traps actually looked like 🙂

    • lucy Hughes says :

      Yes they are quite small about 15cm by 10cm. What you see there is the camera itself inside the back half of the metal protective box. The front half of the protective box has been removed to get at the camera and this is where the snake was sleeping. The boxes make them quite heavy and bulky but it reduces the risk of damage immensely.

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