Tag Archive | hartebeest

Grant Proposal Writing

We’ve recently been working on a grant proposal to continue our camera trap project past 2012. Grant proposal time is always a little bit hectic, and particularly so this time for Ali, who, while running around Arusha to get research permits and supplies and get equipment fixed, has also been ducking into Internet cafes to help with the proposal. This proposal is going to the National Science Foundation, which has funded the bulk of the long-term Lion Project, as well as the first three years of the camera trap survey.

The proposal system is two-tiered. First we submit what is called a “pre-proposal” – a relatively short account of what we want to study and why, along with researchers’ credentials. This is the proposal that’s due today. Over the next six months, NSF will convene a panel to review all the pre-proposals that it receives and will select a fraction of them to invite for a “full proposal” due in August. If we get selected, we will then have to write up a more extensive proposal, describing not only what and why we want to do this research, but also exactly how we’re going to do it and how much money we require. Then another panel is convened to review these proposals, with the results reported in November or December.

Proposals are always helped by “preliminary data” – that is, data that’s not yet ready for publication, but gives a hint at a research study’s power. So we’ve taken the Snapshot Serengeti classifications for Seasons 1-4, run a quick-and-dirty algorithm to pull out images of wildebeest and hartebeest, and then stuck the results on maps, grouped by month. The size of the circles shows how many wildebeest or hartebeest were seen that month by a camera. The background colors show ground vegetation derived from satellite images, so green means, well, the vegetation is green, whereas yellow means less green vegetation, and tan means very little green vegetation.

WildebeestDry

Wildebeest in the dry season (Season 1 and Season 3 on Snapshot Serengeti)

Hartebeest in the dry season (Season 1 and Season 3 on Snapshot Serengeti)

Hartebeest in the dry season (Season 1 and Season 3 on Snapshot Serengeti)

Wildebeest in the wet season (Season 2 and Season 4 on Snapshot Serengeti)

Wildebeest in the wet season (Season 2 and Season 4 on Snapshot Serengeti)

HartebeestWet

Hartebeest in the wet season (Season 2 and Season 4 on Snapshot Serengeti)

(You can click on any of these images to see a larger version.)

These maps show variation from month to month and season to season in the greenness of the vegetation and the response of the grazers to that vegetation. They also show that these patterns vary from year to year. We’ve used this variation as a foundation to our proposal: how do these different patterns in vegetation that vary over time affect the grazers in the Serengeti? How do the variations in grazers affect the predators?

What questions spring to your mind when you look at these maps?

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 4,741 other followers